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Survivability

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 5:47 am
by Bob
Assuming the Zombie infestation is caused by a virus which kills and turns you.
10% of the population would be immune.
In my state that would leave a million survivors.
The national average of people over 65 is 15%
So lets assume 10% of that 15 percent is incapable of living after the fall due to lack of meds or general infirmity.
We are now at 9 hundred thousand (900000)
The national average of blindness is 2.3 percent bringing us down to 879300
The national average of deafness is .38 bringing us down to 875958
The national average percentage of adults who cannot walk a quarter (1/4) mile is 7.1 bringing us down to 813764

Now if we assume a 50% loss of life due to misadventure such as falls, being bitten, killed in a car crash, killed by roving bands of other survivors, other disease etc.
We arrive at our new total of 406882
That is still a lot of survivors eating non replaceable food and taking non replaceable drugs.

Thoughts?

Re: Survivability

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 8:39 am
by zombreach
We're screwed! LOL!!

With your scenario, it seems like a lot of people remaining, but there is going to be a lot of food and medicine around in the beginning. Most homes would have at least a few days to a weeks worth of food inside their pantries, not to mention those who have larger stocks. A lot of people would die during the first winter--even in the southern states. I think your number of survivors is a bit high considering how many people would not be able to cope with life minus the simplest of luxuries.

Also, food is a renewable source. If a secure place is available, growing crops and raising livestock is easy enough--it is not rocket science. Certain medications can be made or substitutions found with herbal sources.

The really difficult part would be the number of undead roaming and looking for food. Eventually they would find most settlements, unless they eventually die out due to lack of sustenance--or simply rotting until nothing is left but bone.

Re: Survivability

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 12:38 pm
by Bob
Z
I agree with what you are saying about food.
I was referring to processed / long term preserved foods.
MRE's are a perfect example.

My math is not good there is duplication / cross overs there that skew the numbers.
I think it gives a decent estimate though.

And Oh Hell Yea!
I have camped in the winter months in the deep South and take it from me it gets cold enough to kill the infirm and unprepared.

Re: Survivability

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 4:01 pm
by Red Star
Try camping up here in the winter, it's LOTS of fun!!! :Huge:

Re: Survivability

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2016 4:27 pm
by zombreach
I have never camped in the winter in the northern states--not with snow on the ground. I have slept in a tent when the temperatures have gotten below freezing, but the days were warm, and it was not fun. I am sure with enough preparation and clothing, it could be done, but I left the north to escape those cold nights.

Re: Survivability

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2016 5:25 am
by Bob
I remember one camping trip where it was so cold it caused me to get a winter sleeping bag.
I shivered all night.
The polar explorers must have been some tough guys.

Re: Survivability

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2016 8:58 am
by Red Star
I never had a winter sleeping bag...

I am somewhat certain I would do better in the colder climate than down south as far as survival goes.

Re: Survivability

PostPosted: Sat Mar 26, 2016 8:32 am
by Bob
Red you may be right.
Camping in the middle of summer is brutal.
The heat will kill.
I wound up with a bag rated for such cold weather it was hugely thick.
I used a much lighter one in the summer.

Re: Survivability

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 12:15 pm
by kiltedninja
I've got two sleeping bags. One is a "three season" bag, and with the appropriate supplements like a poncho liner and the right thermal layers can be used in winter. Even in relatively cold ones (coldest I've ever used it in was -15 or so). The winter bag was used in colder than that and in order to keep from sweating I had to strip bare ass naked to use it. Which is a joy when you wake up before sunrise at 8000 feet in January.

Re: Survivability

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 4:09 pm
by UnderDude
Check out SnugPak sleeping bags. I've got 2, the jungle bag (rated to 30) and the Merlin (rated to 10). Tough, warm, and compact.